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Matching farmers to innovation in Africa makes communities resilient to climate change

Matching farmers to innovation in Africa makes communities resilient to climate change

On the frontline of climate change, farmers across Africa face huge challenges to their livelihoods. But EU supported projects show what can be achieved when we matchmake these farmers with innovations farmers from the private sector.

Rhys Bucknall-Williams is a Global Communications and Knowledge Manager at CGIAR.

The dust has settled on COP26. Food and agriculture appeared high on the COP agenda as never before, rightly taking its place as one the key sectors that contribute to climate change, yet also most vulnerable to its effects.

Campaigns like ClimateShot demonstrated how innovation helps vulnerable communities build more climate-resilient livelihoods and feed growing communities as the world’s population is expected to reach 10 billion by 2050.

Nowhere is this more true than in Africa, and next year’s COP27 in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, is important.

Climate action for communities across Africa will be front and center of debate in Sharm el-Sheikh, with greater emphasis than usual on the role of agriculture, farming and food systems, which are central to so many African economies.

It’s critical that we better understand how farmers actually adopt climate-smart agricultural technologies and practices on the massive scale needed to address the climate crisis.

Projects like ‘Building Livelihoods and Resilience to Climate Change in East and West Africa’ – funded by the European Union and supported by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) – deploy Agricultural Research for Development (AR4D) to answer how.

Matchmakers must connect innovations to farmers

Many of us are familiar with how apps like Uber and Lyft have radically changed mobility ing major cities around the world.

In Kenya, a mobile app called Hello Tractor connects farmers to scarce tractor and related equipment that is often unaffordable to farmers to own outright.


By Rhys Bucknall-Williams | CGIAR 06-01-2022 (updated: 06-01-2022 ) [Shutterstock/Wiiin] Comments Print Email Facebook Twitter LinkedIn WhatsApp This article is part of our special report Accelerating climate smart agriculture in Africa.On the frontline of climate change, farmers across Africa face....
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